MakerBot Stories | A New Frontier in Tracheal Repair

Your trachea, or windpipe, connects the throat and lungs. Air comes in through the windpipe; carbon dioxide goes out.

If it is torn or diseased, surgeons have two ways to fix it. They can remove the damaged part and attach the healthy ends, but there’s only so much slack. Or they can extract some rib cartilage and graft it into the windpipe, which is also made of cartilage. Additional surgery has risks, however. So some patients can’t be helped.

But what if doctors could grow you a new piece of windpipe, just the size and shape you need, from your own cartilage cells?

For the past year, the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, in Manhasset, NY, has been exploring this question in collaboration with MakerBot.

The team of surgeons and scientists at the Feinstein Institute, the research branch of the North Shore-LIJ Health System, has grown cartilage on a scaffolding made from ordinary MakerBot PLA Filament. Their remarkable results, early investigations that might lead to a clinical breakthrough, are being presented today at the annual meeting of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons, in San Diego, CA.

Tissue Engineering + 3D Printing = New Possibilities
(...weiter auf makerbot.com)

MakerBot Stories | Feinstein Institute for Medical Research

MakerBot Stories | Feinstein Institute for Medical Research from MakerBot on Vimeo.


A team of surgeons and scientists at the Feinstein Institute of Medical Research, the research branch of the North Shore-LIJ Health System, has grown cartilage on a 3D printed scaffolding, pointing the way to custom repairs for damaged and diseased tracheas, or windpipes. The cells grow on a scaffolding created from ordinary MakerBot PLA Filament on a MakerBot Replicator 2X Experimental 3D Printer. “3D printing and tissue engineering have the potential to replace lots of different parts of the human body,” says Dr. Lee Smith, a pediatric otolargyngologist who participated in the research. “The potential for creating replacement parts is almost limitless.”
(Quelle: Vimeo)